Virginia GOP Says Dem. Opposing Racism Is a “Christian-hating bigot”

It is stunning, really, that the state with a motto “Virginia is for lovers” has been the scene of a world of hatred lately. Of course the hate-fest in Charlottesville was attended by a fair number of white supremacists from out of state, and no doubt the haters were all Trump supporters as well as Republicans; but there is something else about Virginia’s Republicans that reveal they emanate hatred. In fact, Virginia Republicans are some downright nasty characters and this week, for the second time in six years, the official Republican Party of Virginia (RVP) has distinguished itself as a horrific example of shameless hatred..

As a secular humanist, one has very little f*ck to give about what the faithful do as long as they are harmless and doing it with themselves. In fact, if the bastardized Christians in the Republican ranks and religious right would hew close to the Jesus teaching of brotherly love, charity and acceptance, they may not be perceived as religious haters on a crusade to control the nation.

When a Virginia Democrat who served in Congress, former Rep. Tom Perriello, called out his “fellow Christians” on Twitter for “ignoring the issue of white supremacy while cloaking themselves in the mantle of their faith,” the Virginia GOP reacted like the haters they are. The Virginia GOP said that because Perriello had the temerity to speak out against white supremacists, he was “a Christian-hating bigot.”

It is a fairly hateful, and odd, thing for so-called religious Republicans to say; particularly because Mr. Perriello was expressing his opinion  from an explicitly Christian perspective against white supremacy.  It is curious that the Virginia GOP, a group that knows Perriello well, would label him a “Christian-hating bigot” when they know he has served as a consultant to the evangelical National Council of Churches of Christ and aided in starting several evangelical faith-based advocacy organizations. Obviously he can in no normal universe be regarded as a “Christian hater.”

Mr. Perriello launched a series of three “Tweets” in response to the violence in Charlottesville at the hands of Donald J. Trump’s white supremacist and Nazi devotees. Perriello appealed to religious right leaders who have not spoken out against white supremacists and called on them to “at least” acknowledge that “racism and white supremacy are a Christian problem.” It is a problem Perriello acknowledges and felt he had to call out the white religious right who are certainly Republicans. He said via Twitter:

White evangelical leaders [whose] whiteness is the golden calf you choose to worship and idolize, is blasphemy of God’s word,”

Any white pastor or priest not preaching this weekend on white supremacy as blaspheming the image of God is another is part of the problem.

 If you have a white pastor/priest who doesn’t preach on white supremacy as blasphemy against image of God in another, please say something.”

Perriello’s entreaty to his fellow white evangelicals, and their clergy, to “please say something” about the white supremacy and racism permeating the South was a bridge too far for the religious fanatics in the Virginia GOP.  Their response was pure Trump and doubled down on Virginia Republican hatred. The Republican Party of Virginia “tweeted:”

Let’s not mince words: you are a Christian-hating bigot We were better off when you were out of the country. #LeftWingBigot

Now, Mr. Perriello’s call to speak out against white supremacy, from his devout Christian worldview, was not an outlier by any means; not now and not historically. After Charlottesville, there were myriad denominations’ leaders speaking out against white supremacy and racism; even some of Republicans’ most fanatical evangelical leaders including Trump’s personal spiritual advisor.

In fact, as noted by Alison R. Parker at ShareBlue, “opposition to white supremacy has long been a bedrock principle for many people of Christian faith; including America’s 19th Century abolitionist movement.” Ms. Parker quoted Christianity Today noting:

Not that all abolitionists were orthodox Christians, though a large proportion were. But even those who had left the church drew on unmistakably Christian premises, especially on one crucial point: slavery was sin. Sin could not be solved by political compromise or sociological reform, abolitionists maintained. It required repentance; otherwise America would be punished by God.”

Now, ignore that weary nonsense about god punishing America. No sane human being believes that now in the 21st Century, and it is likely that few believed it in the 19th Century either. However, the bit about opposition to slavery, white supremacy and racism being  “unmistakably Christian premises” could not be more true if uttered by mythological Jesus himself.

It isn’t clear if some right wing evangelical leader put the Virginia GOP up to the seriously nasty retort to former Representative Perriello, or if they came up with it of their own accord. It is quite likely that Perriello’s message hit home with the religious Republicans ensconced in the Virginia GOP leadership and instead of actually addressing the substance of his call to action against white supremacy, they acted like Trump and attacked what appears to be a ‘real Christian’ appealing to white evangelicals to “please say something” about white supremacy.

In the same manner the preponderance of Republicans are not screaming out against Trump’s, and their racist white supremacist supporters, white evangelical clergy are staying predictably silent. Neither Republicans nor bastardized Christians are going to criticize what is almost certainly the GOP’s most reliable voting base. But they are quick to loudly criticize a religious Democrat for opposing white supremacy.

h/t AlisonRParker

Trump Gives Nazis the Legitimacy They Want

 

It would be a stunning revelation to learn that anyone in America believed for a second that Trump was being sincere when he uttered the words “white supremacists, neo-Nazis, K.K.K., and other hate groups” in the same sentence as “evil” on Monday.  By now, everyone and their pet canary knows that Trump resisted his own administration’s pleas to at least feign some outrage at his most fervent base of support for the violence and deaths in Charlottesville over the weekend. Apparently his chief of staff Kelly tricked him into saying something semi-respectable with assurances it would hasten his much-needed legislative accomplishments and achieve his lofty agenda sooner rather than later.

However, Trump could barely contain his revulsion at being pressured into reading an anonymously created script that infuriated his white supremacist devotees, and that pent-up revulsion came screaming out loud yesterday when he doubled down on his initial comments in what was reported as a combative exchange with reporters.

What Trump’s remarks blaming the anti-racist protestors for the violence in Charlottesville really amounted to was one giant mea culpa to the Nazis, KKK, and white supremacists for his comments on Monday. Trump’s remarks yesterday were what the New York Times rightly stated was giving the K.K.K., white supremacists, and Nazis “an unequivocal boost.”

That boost also served, as it was intended, to encourage and legitimize the Nazis and white supremacists by portraying Americans who oppose racism, fascism and white supremacy as “very, very violent” and really bad people. Many observers claimed Trump was in a flaming rage during his assault on decent Americans in front of the press, but it was really a bit of propaganda to portray opposition to him and his nasty Nazis as “very, very violent” behavior by “really bad people.” Americans can expect to hear a lot more of that propaganda going forward with terms like “alt-left, radical leftists, and leftist terrorists.”

No doubt Trump chose those terms while he perused the white supremacists websites criticizing him as a “cuck” for daring to insinuate in a prepared statement on Monday that the Nazis went to a protest armed and looking for violence; even though they advertised heavily that they were looking for violence and told their supporters to prepare for it. As Philip Bump noted in a WaPo article, Trump’s latest remarks “put a fine point on it, he sides with the alt-right [Nazis] in Charlottesville.” (author bold)

Trump had a lot to say in defense of his initial remarks that “many sides” were to blame for the racist violence, but it all focused on how he was “right” in claiming that “his people” were innocent and peaceful bystanders who were charged  and  viciously attacked by something he called “the alt-left.” The anti-racist and anti-fascists are not the “alt-left,” they are democracy-loving humanitarians the Nazis have pledged to confront again if they dare to exercise their constitutional rights to oppose fascism and white supremacy.

Shortly after Trump reiterated, with anger, that the real terrorists in Charlottesville were those protesting against fascism and white supremacy,  the Nazis cult was duly satisfied; but none more than former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke who was elated. He tweeted:

Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about Charlottesville & condemn the leftist terrorists in BLM/Antifa.”

And one of the leading racists and white nationalist (supremacist) leaders who was an active participant in the Charlottesville Nazi-fest, Richard Spencer, was as super-excited and emboldened as Duke by Trump’s remarks. Spencer needed the tacit White House approval to keep advancing the Nazi cause after vowing over the weekend to “flood Charlottesville with similar protests in the coming weeks.” Spencer said:

Trump’s statement was fair and down to earth (sic). I’m proud of him for speaking the truth.”

No doubt part of the so-called “truth” according to the Nazis is that anyone opposing the fascist white supremacists, and by extension Trump, is a “very, very violent leftist terrorist” and that the racists in the Nazi white supremacist movement are “very fine people.” It’s true Trump didn’t call the Nazis “my people,” but that is precisely what his devotees in the white supremacist movement heard and now know to be true; Donald J. Trump is one of them and they have his administration’s blessing and backing.

By resolutely  asserting that Americans protesting against racism and fascism were more responsible for the “bloody and deadly” violence in Charlottesville than his supporters”brandishing swastikas, Confederate battle flags, clubs, shields, long rifles, anti-Semitic banners and Trump/Pence campaign signs,” Trump signaled to the Nazis he was defending them. As no small number of commentators and pundits have already noted, Trump’s comments on Tuesday “legitimized white supremacists [Nazis] like no president in modern history;” because he is, after all, just another Nazi fascist and an evil racist.

Charlottesville Was Alt-Right’s Prelude To Civil War

Any American paying attention to Trump’s presidential campaign quickly realized that he was not appealing to economically-challenged Americans, the working class, or people concerned about terrorism or national security. Whether it was the racist dog whistles or blatant attacks on minorities and immigrants, Trump pandered and appealed to racists and it is why they are growing dangerously ascendant every day.

It’s highly likely that Trump was only taken seriously as a presidential candidate by his “basketful of deplorables” because he spent several years attempting to delegitimize President Barack Obama based on the Trump lie that he was not a real American. Trump was smart enough not to call the President illegitimate simply because he was Black, but to racists and white supremacists Trump’s message was crystal clear; America belongs to the white man.

To be fair, the racial animus toward people of color did not start with Trump; it had been simmering since the 1960s and became a popular worldview among Republicans with Barack Obama’s election. That racial animus was accompanied by a new call to “take our country back” by conservatives who weren’t concerned about a Democratic administration, higher taxes or regulations; they were appalled that a non-white man had attained the highest office in the land. Although the so-called “alt-right” as a “named movement” would emerge a few years after President Obama’s election, it existed all the same under the neo-Nazi, white supremacist, Ku Klux Klan, white power and former-Confederate monikers.

No matter what the organizers of the deadly Charlottesville “rally” claimed publicly, they were not protesting over a statue’s removal; they were sending a signal that their crusade to recreate the Confederacy was underway. Any American who believes otherwise, or that the racist “alt-right Nazis” will stand down after Charlottesville haven’t been paying attention. The alt-right and all of its white supremacist iterations have already pledged to return to advance their crusade to create “a white man’s land.”

As Slate’s Tom Perriello noted, the rally’s organizers may have used the removal of a Confederate statue as it’s primary purpose of the protest, but after cries of “Heil Trump, blood and soil, and Jews won’t replace us,” it was nothing but a Nazi assault on America’s diverse population. The so-called “alt-right” has one goal that fits seamlessly with the former Confederacy and 1930s Nazi Germany: a nation ruled according to white supremacy. And that idea of a separate Aryan nation is what the movement’s leaders have been on a crusade to garner support for; restoring the Confederate States of America.

According to “League of the South” president, Michael Hill, his movement’s intent is clearly elucidated in a Facebook post titled “fight or die white man.” There can be little doubt what the “Unite the Alt-right” protest was really all about.

What we nationalists seek is nothing less than the complete re-conquest and restoration of our patrimony – the whole, entire South. And that means the South will once again be in name and in actuality White Man’s Land.”

The League of the South, Daily Stormer, Occidental Dissent, and several other “alt-right” related groups want to secede again and restore the Confederacy. And, if it means triggering a second Civil War, so be it. The League of the South has already “erected billboards that say ‘SECEDE’ in several states” including creating a banner for the coming battle to establish their “white man’s land;” a black and white version of the Confederate battle flag sans stars. The Associated press reported that, “Secession finds support on [alt-right related] websites that support white nationalism, including Occidental Dissent, and the openly racist, anti-Semitic Daily Stormer.

No American should think that the nation has seen the end of the violence accompanying the alt-right’s “rally” just because their champion (Trump) was pressured to call out the hate of white supremacists. In fact, although they pledged to descend on Charlottesville again, and started more trouble in San Antonio Texas over a different Confederate traitor’s “statue,” their intent is preparation to shed blood to create their “white man’s land.” It is a deep-seated goal they’ve harbored for generations and they are anxious for a reason, any reason, to wage war to achieve that goal. In case it seems too far-fetched to believe, the League of the South president alerted white nationalists to prepare for war. He wrote on Election Day, 2016:

If Trump’s enemies win, they will be coming for blood. If they lose, they will be coming for blood. And that’s fine with us. We have prepared for this day.”

Even though no-one except Trump’s supporters are “coming for blood,” after months of escalating their level of violent rhetoric,  a White House occupant’s tacit support, and a message that the time has come to get strong for battle, the alt-right is telling its supporters to prepare for violence to create a white man’s land. After what happened in Charlottesville, their threats cannot be dismissed as “bluster” any longer. They are deadly serious, heavily armed and have several allies ensconced in the White House and more government agencies than most Americans are aware of.

In February Republican Said Running Down Protestors Was Common Sense

 

So, after a neo-Nazi drove into a crowd of Americans protesting against racists and fascists killing one and injuring 19 others, Republicans have come out calling it an act of white supremacist terrorism. Many Republicans even lashed out at the Nazi in the Oval Office because he refused to condemn his base and instead blamed “many sides” for bigotry and hate-driven mayem. That’s awfully generous of the GOP and although it appears everyone should afford them some small measure of deference for condemning the fascist they have moved the proverbial heaven and the real Earth to protect; they cannot possibly be taken seriously.

First, where was the GOP criticism of Trump when he ignored a terror attack on a Minnesota mosque last week, or when a white man drove his car into an English mosque? One can’t help but believe if the young woman who was murdered by one of Trump’s Nazis on Saturday was not white, there may have been no comments at all; especially for using a motor vehicle to “run down protestors.”

This is particularly true among Republican states where legislation was introduced to allow motorists to “run down protestors” with impunity; including legal immunity from any civil action. What happened in Charlottesville on Saturday is certainly down to Donald Trump’s loving embrace of the white supremacist movement, but Republicans bear a major share of the blame for never harshly condemning their party’s attempt to legalize opposing a protest with a motor vehicle.

Of course none of the Republicans who condemned Trump’s refusal to call out his Nazi base (they never condemned his affiliation with Nazis) have openly advocated for allowing their supporters to “run down protestors with cars,” but they also haven’t condemned members of their own party who have “tacitly advocated running down protestors with cars.” It has been a hot topic for discussion among conservatives who detest the idea of free speech, peaceable assembly, or freedom or expression if it is in opposition to conservatives’ agenda.

As Matthew Chapman noted over at Share Blue, during the demonstrations by Native Americans opposing Trump for supporting for the Dakota Access Pipeline, an avowed Republican “tweeted, and then deleted, ‘I wonder how many #NativeNationsRise #NoDAPL protestors I could run over before I got arrested.’” That bit of fascism was courtesy of Daily Caller editor Katie Frates and was not an isolated display of Republican opposition to dissenting voices. And it is particularly noteworthy that all of this fascist targeting constitutionally-guaranteed peaceful protests began directly after Trump’s inauguration and the truly monumental, and peaceable, nationwide women’s protest against the fascist in the White House.

Of course a Trump-supporting Nazi would run down peaceful protestors, it is what Republicans have been attempting to legalize since Trump has been in the White House. Earlier in the year the North Carolina House introduced two separate bills targeting peaceful protestors on two counts. First, one of the GOP bills would declare protestors guilty of a newly-created crime, “economic terrorism” and allow authorities to “seize all real and personal property associated with protest.”  The second bill stripped peaceful protestors of the right to file a civil lawsuit against any driver who drove into them under the guise of protecting the protestors. The second Republican bill was a late March, 2017 response to protests that occurred last fall in Charlotte – before Trump was elected.

Republicans introduced similar bills to North Carolina’s in Tennessee and North Dakota. Both Republican bills “banned peaceful protestors who were ‘run over’ by angry drivers from suing their motorized assailants.” The Tennessee legislation targeted anyone “participating in a protest or demonstration” that a driver believes is “blocking traffic in a public right-of-way.” Republicans called the bill “common sense legislation to protect everyone’s right to peacefully protest.”

The Republican bill in North Dakota, House Bill 1203, was sponsored by state Representative Keith Kempenich who owns a trucking company. Kempenich’s bill was offered specifically to protect drivers who injure or kill protestors on a public road or highway. Kempenich denied his proposal was to prevent protests against the hotly-contested Dakota Access Pipeline, even though he wants it built for the economic benefit it will bring; he just wants to “see it done right” without interference or opposition from protestors.

Although not giving conservatives legal authority to run over protestors, an Indiana bill directed law enforcement to us ‘any means necessary’ to put a stop to protests. The Republican sponsor, State Senator Tim Jones claimed protestors are a “lethal menace” because they are guilty of “preventing first responders from reaching people in time.” As is typically the case with lying Republicans, Mr. Jones was unable to cite even one example of such an incident ever happening.

It’s unclear if the Nazi who rammed a car into peaceful protestors and killed a young woman and injured several others was aware of the GOP’s crusade to decriminalize running down peaceful protestors or not. But whether he did or not at the time of his Nazi rampage, his defense team surely will explain to the jury that he was only acting according to legislation being proposed in several Republican states.

Republicans were right to condemn Trump for not specifically calling out his Nazi supporters’ acts of violence driven by hatred and bigotry, but they cannot possibly feign disgust that one of Trump’s acolytes rammed a car into a crown of innocent protestors; especially after spending months “demonizing and denying the rights of protestors” and making serious attempts to legalize running them down with cars.