Did Trump Betray His Base By Signing Resolution Condemning Hate?

 

It was lightly reported in the media that most Republicans in Congress joined Democrats on Monday past to “deliver a notable rebuke to President Trump” over his warm embrace of fascists and white supremacists. Both houses of the  legislature fairly dared Trump to condemn his fascist acolytes for “the violence and domestic terrorist attack” that occurred last month around a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. Trump finally signed the “joint resolution” yesterday condemning his most reliable supporters as domestic terrorists, but if any American believes for a nano-second that Trump will follow through on any of the “recommendations” Congress strongly urged of him, they are foolish lunatics. Trump loves his fascist supporters because they are white supremacists and they are safe under his administration.

For over a year Trump has put Republicans in the unenviable position of having to suffer his untoward remarks while carefully weighing how much damage they will do to their own careers if they rebuke their  Party’s standard bearer. Even though it’s safe to say many Republicans agree with every word Trump utters, at least most of them have enough self-restraint to keep their true bigoted opinions and racism close to the vest.

After Trump sided with white supremacists and Nazis after they killed a woman and injured dozens for opposing Nazi fascists in Charlottesville Virginia, Republicans refused to sanction  or censure Trump; he is a fellow Republican after all.  All they could bring themselves to do publicly was offer tepid disgust over Trump’s affinity with racists and fascists and his accusation that Americans protesting against hate and fascism are “really bad.”

The resolution Trump signed late Thursday passed with a unanimous vote in the House and a solid majority of the Senate. It had to have stung Trump that Congress actually passed a “joint resolution calling the Charlottesville protest a domestic terror attack” he had to sign to make it official.  This particular joint resolution was rare because Democrats and Republicans structured it specifically to require Trump’s signature to pass. In fact, one of the measure’s sponsors, Senator Tim Kaine explained why he was pleased the bipartisan measure passed so easily. He said:

I think it’s great for [Democrats and Republicans] to be able to make a moral call that white supremacy’s not acceptable, and I want the president to have to sign it. We wouldn’t have had to add in that point had he not demonstrated this moral equivocation at the time, but I think it would be a really good thing.

Here’s the thing, even though Trump signed the resolution, he still demonstrates “moral equivocation” by repeating his claim that inspired the bipartisan joint resolution in the first place.  Trump signed the measure just a few hours after comparing his most ardent supporters that Congress labeled “hate groups that espouse racism, extremism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, and White supremacy” as “domestic terrorists” to the counter-protestors in Charlottesville.

If Trump was sincere, he would never have repeated the comments that counter-protestors were “just as bad” as the fascists they were protesting against. It is very telling that Trump doubled down on his vile comments that inspired Congress to pass the joint resolution in the first place; he is still solidly behind his fascist base.

The resolution called on Trump to not only speak out against his devotees and condemn them as domestic terrorists and hate groups, it “urged” the administration to “use all resources available to the President Trump and the President’s Trump’s Cabinet to address the growing prevalence of those hate groups in the United States.”

Congress also brought pressure to bear on Trump’s racist attorney general calling on Sessions to “investigate acts of violence or domestic terrorism perpetrated by white supremacists.” In fact, it called on Sessions to direct the Department of Justice to work closely with the Department of Homeland Security to:

Investigate thoroughly all acts of violence,  intimidation, and domestic terrorism by White supremacists, White nationalists, neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan, and associated groups in order to determine if any criminal laws have been violated and to prevent those groups from fomenting and facilitating additional violence.”

Prior to signing the resolution, Trump told reporters:

“I think especially in light of the advent of antifa, if you look at what’s going on there, you know, you have some pretty bad dudes on the other side also. A lot of people are saying — in fact a lot of people have actually written —  ‘Gee, Trump might have a point.’  I said, you got some very bad people on the other side also, which is true.”

No, Trump doesn’t have a point no matter how many times he attempts to equate Americans opposing fascism as “very bad people.” Trump is a punk-ass fascist for attempting to demonize the counter protestors opposed to fascists the bipartisan “joint resolution” never mentioned; except to honor the memory of slain anti-fascist protestor Heather Heyer and the first responders who perished while monitoring the Nazi fascists.

As an aside, and a little historical reminder for dumb Donnie, the advent of the anti-fascist movement goes back to at least World War II when the entirety of the American people banded together and went to war to defeat the same fascists Trump’s supporters are emulating. It is likely why the congressional resolution included no criticism whatsoever of the counter-protestors; even Republicans comprehend that people who oppose fascism, including Trump’s fascism, are not “very bad  people.”

In normal times, standing in opposition to an historical American enemy, the fascists, would be rewarded. Instead, Trump uses a pejorative made up by his Nazi fascist supporters, “antifa” when referring to patriots who oppose him and his fascist sycophants. No doubt most Americans identify as ‘anti-fascists” and if they don’t they are likely Nazi racists.

Even though he signed the joint resolution, no-one should hold their breath waiting for him to “use all resources available to address the growing prevalence of those hate groups in the United States.” And it is likely that few people expect Jeff Sessions to work with Homeland Security to “investigate acts of violence or domestic terrorism perpetrated by white supremacists.

Remember, one of Trump’s first acts was instructing the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to stop investigating domestic terrorism associated with “white supremacist and militia” groups. It is one thing to sign a meaningless joint resolution, but it is contrary to Trump’s worldview to take action against his most valued supporters; particularly after they made a big deal expressing their undying gratitude for his action neutering the FBI and Homeland Security’s investigative power that gave the alt-right (Nazi) fascists what they desired most; “space to destroy.

Trump’s attempt to equate violent fascists and hate groups with patriots opposed to fascists and hate groups was no mistake, and the timing of his comments hours before signing the resolution was no coincidence. He sent a signal to his fascist supporters that he will use his White House platform and authority to portray “his” opposition as the real bad guys; it is a tried-and-true Nazi propaganda technique.

After his remarks defining Americans protesting fascism as “some pretty bad dudes” just hours before signing Congress’ joint resolution, it is possible that there is some kind of White House announcement in the works. Likely to sate his fascist zealots,  Trump will issue an executive order instructing the FBI, Department of Justice, and Homeland Security to target the people who oppose fascism mirroring the language in the Congress’ joint resolution; it is precisely what Americans should expect from the petty fascist in the White House.

 

According To the “Duck Test” Trump Is a Raging White Supremacist

 

Whether they realize it or not, most Americans are familiar with the so-called “duck test.” It is a humorous term for a form of abductive reasoning implying the ease of identifying a subject based on their habitual characteristics. It is typically stated thus:

“If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck then it probably is a duck.

If any American had questions after listening to Donald “Duck” Trump act, walk and talk like a Nazi white supremacist, then they should have no doubts any longer about what he really is. It is particularly true as of late when Trump equated his nasty racist devotees with Americans vehemently opposed to racism. And, as if to display his white supremacist bona fides for all to see, Trump compared the white supremacists’ and Ku Klux Klan’s treasonous Confederate heroes with America’s Founding Fathers George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.

It isn’t that Trump doesn’t know the difference between his white supremacist acolytes and decent Americans who oppose them, or why the nature and symbolism of Confederate statues inclines decent Americans to want them removed; he certainly does. But he doesn’t care because he is a public and private racist and is as ensconced in the white supremacist mindset as every Nazi, white supremacist and K.K.K. member that created havoc and shed blood in Charlottesville last week.

After listening to Trump parroting the exact same talking points as the K.K.K., League of the South, Occidental Dissent, alt-right, Daily Stormer and various Confederate white supremacist groups, it is beyond refute he is one of them. It might be true that Trump doesn’t want to recreate the United States in the image of the Confederacy that attempted to tear America apart, but by venerating its treasonous leaders as some kind of divine cultural icons and defending memorials to their vicious acts and deeds, he may as well hoist a Confederate battle flag over the White House and declare war against the United States of America. In a manner of speaking, he already has.

First, Trump equating the treasonous Robert E. Lee to Founding Fathers George Washington and Thomas Jefferson because the latter owned slaves is simply beyond the pale. Yes, it is problematic that the Founders owned slaves, but they were not traitors to the nation they founded. Conversely, Robert E. Lee left the United States military to wage war against the United States of America; it is the Constitution and U.S. Code definition of what a traitor to America is.

Robert E. Lee only avoided being tried, convicted and executed for treason due to the Herculean effort of Ulysses S. Grant. It was Grant who convinced then-president Andrew Johnson to quash an indictment against Lee for treason. Grant was averse to going back on his word to the Confederate traitors that they would be granted amnesty despite causing the deaths of well over 750,000 Americans in the South’s bloody war against the United States.

That bloody war to “rip apart America” was fought to preserve the South’s ability to own human beings as slaves and it is that “culture” the Trump and his white nationalist acolytes want to “honor.” It is noteworthy that Trump’s acolytes want to rip the country apart again to recreate the Confederacy as “white man’s land” to “reclaim their precious patrimony” the Confederate statues and monuments symbolize.

Trump had the temerity to write on Twitter  that it was “foolish” to remove statues of traitors Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson while putting them in the same class as two of the nation’s Founding Fathers. To sound as close as possible to the white supremacists and Klan members in Charlottesville last week, Trump wrote:

Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart with the removal of our beautiful statues and monuments.”

It was sickening that Trump accused Americans opposed to memorials to slavery and treason as “ripping apart our great country’s culture” when those same memorials honor the traitors who literally attempted to “rip our great nation apart.”

That language was not, as the New York Times wrote, “similar to that of white supremacists arguing the statues should remain in place.” It was verbatim parroting directly from the League of the South, Ku Klux Klan, and Occidental Dissent that claim the Civil War had nothing to do with white men subjugating another race.

Back in May the Los Angeles Times editorial board noted:

Despite the assertions of apologists [like Trump], the war was not a fight to repel Northern aggression — the South fired first — nor to save a genteel agrarian culture. Those who continue to romanticize antebellum Dixie willingly embrace a world that found its meaning in the violent subjugation of another race.” )author bold)

In fact, that subjugation continued well beyond the end of the Civil War and it is precisely what white supremacists and Nazis want to re-establish; including maintaining the Confederate traitors’ statues to remind African Americans that they are sub human in “white man’s land.”

A fair number of those statues and monuments to the Confederacy were erected several decades after the Civil War ended during the so-called “second rise” of the racist Ku Klux Klan. They reflected a hateful attempt by Southern racists to “rewrite the past and intimidate African Americans already beaten down by Jim Crow laws and a caste system based on one superior race.”

As noted in the New York Times, “a statue of [Robert E.] Lee in a town square sends a frightening message [to African Americans] that the [Civil] war might be over, but the South is still the [white supremacist] South.”

If any American uses abductive reasoning, the so-called “duck test,” to identify Trump according to his characteristic traits, worldview, and speech, they are left with no other conclusion than he is a Nazi white supremacist in the mold of his avid K.K.K supporters. That same test can be employed to identify the great majority of Republicans who are still standing with Trump. Republicans may not express their white supremacy out loud like Trump, but by not demanding he resign immediately or impeaching him with extreme prejudice, they are as abominably racist as their Nazi white supremacist leader.