Did Trump Betray His Base By Signing Resolution Condemning Hate?

 

It was lightly reported in the media that most Republicans in Congress joined Democrats on Monday past to “deliver a notable rebuke to President Trump” over his warm embrace of fascists and white supremacists. Both houses of the  legislature fairly dared Trump to condemn his fascist acolytes for “the violence and domestic terrorist attack” that occurred last month around a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. Trump finally signed the “joint resolution” yesterday condemning his most reliable supporters as domestic terrorists, but if any American believes for a nano-second that Trump will follow through on any of the “recommendations” Congress strongly urged of him, they are foolish lunatics. Trump loves his fascist supporters because they are white supremacists and they are safe under his administration.

For over a year Trump has put Republicans in the unenviable position of having to suffer his untoward remarks while carefully weighing how much damage they will do to their own careers if they rebuke their  Party’s standard bearer. Even though it’s safe to say many Republicans agree with every word Trump utters, at least most of them have enough self-restraint to keep their true bigoted opinions and racism close to the vest.

After Trump sided with white supremacists and Nazis after they killed a woman and injured dozens for opposing Nazi fascists in Charlottesville Virginia, Republicans refused to sanction  or censure Trump; he is a fellow Republican after all.  All they could bring themselves to do publicly was offer tepid disgust over Trump’s affinity with racists and fascists and his accusation that Americans protesting against hate and fascism are “really bad.”

The resolution Trump signed late Thursday passed with a unanimous vote in the House and a solid majority of the Senate. It had to have stung Trump that Congress actually passed a “joint resolution calling the Charlottesville protest a domestic terror attack” he had to sign to make it official.  This particular joint resolution was rare because Democrats and Republicans structured it specifically to require Trump’s signature to pass. In fact, one of the measure’s sponsors, Senator Tim Kaine explained why he was pleased the bipartisan measure passed so easily. He said:

I think it’s great for [Democrats and Republicans] to be able to make a moral call that white supremacy’s not acceptable, and I want the president to have to sign it. We wouldn’t have had to add in that point had he not demonstrated this moral equivocation at the time, but I think it would be a really good thing.

Here’s the thing, even though Trump signed the resolution, he still demonstrates “moral equivocation” by repeating his claim that inspired the bipartisan joint resolution in the first place.  Trump signed the measure just a few hours after comparing his most ardent supporters that Congress labeled “hate groups that espouse racism, extremism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, and White supremacy” as “domestic terrorists” to the counter-protestors in Charlottesville.

If Trump was sincere, he would never have repeated the comments that counter-protestors were “just as bad” as the fascists they were protesting against. It is very telling that Trump doubled down on his vile comments that inspired Congress to pass the joint resolution in the first place; he is still solidly behind his fascist base.

The resolution called on Trump to not only speak out against his devotees and condemn them as domestic terrorists and hate groups, it “urged” the administration to “use all resources available to the President Trump and the President’s Trump’s Cabinet to address the growing prevalence of those hate groups in the United States.”

Congress also brought pressure to bear on Trump’s racist attorney general calling on Sessions to “investigate acts of violence or domestic terrorism perpetrated by white supremacists.” In fact, it called on Sessions to direct the Department of Justice to work closely with the Department of Homeland Security to:

Investigate thoroughly all acts of violence,  intimidation, and domestic terrorism by White supremacists, White nationalists, neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan, and associated groups in order to determine if any criminal laws have been violated and to prevent those groups from fomenting and facilitating additional violence.”

Prior to signing the resolution, Trump told reporters:

“I think especially in light of the advent of antifa, if you look at what’s going on there, you know, you have some pretty bad dudes on the other side also. A lot of people are saying — in fact a lot of people have actually written —  ‘Gee, Trump might have a point.’  I said, you got some very bad people on the other side also, which is true.”

No, Trump doesn’t have a point no matter how many times he attempts to equate Americans opposing fascism as “very bad people.” Trump is a punk-ass fascist for attempting to demonize the counter protestors opposed to fascists the bipartisan “joint resolution” never mentioned; except to honor the memory of slain anti-fascist protestor Heather Heyer and the first responders who perished while monitoring the Nazi fascists.

As an aside, and a little historical reminder for dumb Donnie, the advent of the anti-fascist movement goes back to at least World War II when the entirety of the American people banded together and went to war to defeat the same fascists Trump’s supporters are emulating. It is likely why the congressional resolution included no criticism whatsoever of the counter-protestors; even Republicans comprehend that people who oppose fascism, including Trump’s fascism, are not “very bad  people.”

In normal times, standing in opposition to an historical American enemy, the fascists, would be rewarded. Instead, Trump uses a pejorative made up by his Nazi fascist supporters, “antifa” when referring to patriots who oppose him and his fascist sycophants. No doubt most Americans identify as ‘anti-fascists” and if they don’t they are likely Nazi racists.

Even though he signed the joint resolution, no-one should hold their breath waiting for him to “use all resources available to address the growing prevalence of those hate groups in the United States.” And it is likely that few people expect Jeff Sessions to work with Homeland Security to “investigate acts of violence or domestic terrorism perpetrated by white supremacists.

Remember, one of Trump’s first acts was instructing the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to stop investigating domestic terrorism associated with “white supremacist and militia” groups. It is one thing to sign a meaningless joint resolution, but it is contrary to Trump’s worldview to take action against his most valued supporters; particularly after they made a big deal expressing their undying gratitude for his action neutering the FBI and Homeland Security’s investigative power that gave the alt-right (Nazi) fascists what they desired most; “space to destroy.

Trump’s attempt to equate violent fascists and hate groups with patriots opposed to fascists and hate groups was no mistake, and the timing of his comments hours before signing the resolution was no coincidence. He sent a signal to his fascist supporters that he will use his White House platform and authority to portray “his” opposition as the real bad guys; it is a tried-and-true Nazi propaganda technique.

After his remarks defining Americans protesting fascism as “some pretty bad dudes” just hours before signing Congress’ joint resolution, it is possible that there is some kind of White House announcement in the works. Likely to sate his fascist zealots,  Trump will issue an executive order instructing the FBI, Department of Justice, and Homeland Security to target the people who oppose fascism mirroring the language in the Congress’ joint resolution; it is precisely what Americans should expect from the petty fascist in the White House.